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is in decline. researchers at the australian institute of marine science say the reef has lost half of its coral cover over the past 27 years. there are multiple causes, including a destructive kind of starfish shown here. we look at what's behind it and what's at stake-- in australia and around the world-- with nancy knowlton, a coral reef biologist and a chair of marine science at the smithsonian national museum of natural history here in washington. welcome. >> thanks. how has all of this coral died off? do we know what's causing it? is it all that... >> it's not all the star fish. the star fish is about 42%. typhoons, big strong storms another 48% and then coral bleaching is the remaining 10% which is caused whenever the water gets too hot. >> ifill: so this is human causedded? >> yes. most of it is human caused. i mean a coral reef naturally goes through cycles of up and down. but it shouldn't be declining by half over course of 27 years. >> ifill: i feel like we have talked before about the declining coral cover. but not... but i'm wondering whether it's now picking up speed or whether thi
to be less about public policy being guided by compromise and more about having it be guided by science and by -- [applause] by accurate public policy analysis, by studies show things like what are the rewards that are reaped from investment in public funding of contraception or in having a view of the insured as a society and what as a society we gain from that. what of the consequences if we don't? if it has been very disappointing to see the ways in which over the last few years science is really being pushed out of some much of our legislative process. there are bills that have been enacted across the country requiring medical providers to give statements to women who are coming for services, frequently abortion services that are based on the ranchers science. and that is a scary moment, regardless of how you feel about abortion and what your personal legal police are up at to what to require medical professionals to the mislead their patience is not where we should be as a country, and that in those type of scientific facts and accurate public policy analyses should be given much m
baby. >> doing math with the gets? >> doing s.t.e.avenue. m. >> science, technology, engineering, art and math. >> hey, do you do "gangnam style." >> what does that mean? >> gangnam sfooil? >> psy. the horse dance. >> the horse dance. >> you got it. >> like that. >> there we go. >> oh, yeah. oh, yeah. ♪ >> almost as good as david gregory. >> you name, it elmo can do it. >> there we go. >> that was fantastic. >> let's talk about -- did you read the "new york times." >> yeah, "new york times." there's an article that the word really is overused. >> really? >> really. >> really. >> a whole article devoted to, that really? >> really. >> it used to be kind of like that's surprising, but now it's that snarky really? >> really. >> really. >> it has been overused. by the writers and shows to make that kind of funny turn. it has been a little overused. what are some other -- i'm actually thinking of like, you know, like. >> like, and, you know, i'm a complete offender. >> seriously. >> serious ly. >> really? >> what words are overused? >> elmo loves overusing love. >> oh. >> you can't overus
does. a lot of people in here, remember the question in political science 101, should be elected representative do what he believes is right or what constituents because right? you could answer the question one way or the other. the important thing to take with them it is -- [inaudible] nobody wants to run for office so they can -- a robot into the you what to be a candidate because you believe in something. whatever you want to do. nobody wants you to just pull the lever for what the constituents you to do. so all a super pac and would do is identify places where the elected representative has gone too far from his constituency, and then educate the electorate about how the elected representative is sideways with the public opinion and the people. so you take that crossroads add, we're running it in all the states talk about the president has had this tennis program. testing this thing was wildly unpopular, and all the ads is hold the president or another elected official to account for what they did. it can't change public opinion about the stimulus legislation that we can iden
correct, then that does slide into the -- that does slide from simply being bad science to something more sinister. it's not realistic to think that the 2000 will voter turnout model is valid in 2012. if they are in fact doing that and if i know it they know that it's not a good model. then you do have to wonder if pat caddell is on to something. again, i'm not a conspiracy time of guy so i'm not saying it's rigged. but if they are using a bad model and then they not only do polls, bill, then they write about their own polls and it creates an impression that it's time to write the owe -- obituary for mitt romney. >> bill: there is no that investigates the press because we have freedoms. >> it's the media that should investigate it i'm not holding my breath. >> bill: good luck with that. >> this would be the same media that's doing a lot of the polling. if they are doing the polling. >> bill: people are so distracted they don't remember three days ago what happened. this is what the media banks on. we can make a mistake, nobody is going to remember. we'll just wipe it off the blackboard an
how we hire teachers. not to hire new math and science teachers and create 2 million more slots in our community colleges so people can get trained for the jobs out there right now. and i want to make sure we keep tuition low for our young people. when it comes to our tax code, governor romney and i both agree are corporate tax rate is too high, so i want to lower it, particularly for manufacturing. taken it down to 25%. but i also want to close those loopholes that give incentives for companies shipping jobs overseas. i want to provide tax breaks for companies investing in the united states upon energy. governor romney and i both agree that we've got to boost american energy production and oil and natural gas production are higher than they have been in years. but i also believe that we've got to look at the energy sources of the future, like wind and solar and biofuels and make those investments. so, all of this is possible. now in order for us to do agree how to to close our deficit in one of the things we will discuss tonight is how do we do with our tax code and how do we make sur
of systems all of which are so important to the asia-pacific region. and we'll continue all of our science and technology investments across the board. the third reason why we can carry out the rebalance is that we're shifting our posture forward and into the asia-pacific region; that is, not what we have, but where we put it is also changing. by 2020 we will have shifted 60% of our naval assets to the pacific. that's an historic change for the be united states navy. the marine corps will have up to 2500 marines on rotation in australia, we will have four la toral combat ships stationed forward in singapore, i was just aboard both in san diego last week, and we'll proceed fully to build out our military presence on guam and surrounding areas, which is an important strategic hub for the western pacific. we will begin to rotate b-1 bombers into the region augmenting the b-52 bombers already on continuous rotation. we've already deployed f-22s to kadima air force base in japan, and we will deploy the f-35 joint strike fighter to the region. differently, we're sending our newest assets to the
, rational thought. the current party has waged a war in science. climate denial is horrifying. it's war on reason. you cited former vice president dick cheney that deficits do not matter. karl rove said it that we create our own realities. you live in it. a romney pollsters said we will not be restricted by fact checkers. i refer to a post-truth world. the problem is the policy oriented. the party has been captured by people like grover norquist who is a ferocious anti-tax ideologue who has forced many members of the house and senate to abide by his pledge of no tax increases. where do you get the revenue to help build the country? when people talk about the deficit -- it is not the deficit or debt but joblessness which is the great crisis of our times. the deficit and debt did not arrive from some inaccurate conception. -- immaculate conception. two unfunded wars, medicare part d. let them speak to that. mitt romney has it fantastical approach to arithmetic. at the bottom of it, there is a commitment and an ideology to insuring that the top 1% make out real well. those most vulnerable
, attention and enthusiasm, it matters which voters turn out where. dave robertson, a political science professor at the university of missouri st. louis, says the topsy-turvy election has cut both ways. >> one of the things akin has been able to do is electrify some of the conservative base. but there's a counter movement to that. and at is he's also helped electrify some of the female voters in the state, some of the moderate voters in the state, some of the key voters in the suburbs of this state that are going to determine the outcome of this election. and that's a real disadvantage for him. >> ifill: akin is counting on conservatives, home schooling parents, and evangelicals to rally around his cause. >> we don't tell you who to vote for, but i'm going to tell you how to vote. >> ifill: reverend stoney shaw, pastor of ferguson first baptist church, has known akin for 25 years. >> some of my family, my children were, "dad, how can you support him? everybody is turning against him." i said, "you know, there was another guy everybody turned against-- jesus christ-- but he prevailed. a
was held up the wilson center in june on science and technology and innovation. the symposia, which the institute co-chairs foot china's state council, not only promote dialogue among the stakeholders but allow the participants to develop personal connections. the institute also recently released an initial report on u.s.-china security perceptions, and other big project we are working on with leading research institutions in the u.s. and beijing. just last month we published the u.s. cooperation and clean energy and the review of the difficulties both countries face in developing solar, wind and other alternative energy industries and the potential room for cooperation. last november, finally, henry participated in another one of our national conversations entitled afghanistan is there a regional and gamecocks the story on this is interesting. he resisted when he learned we get organized a brilliant panel of scholars and reporters to comment on his remarks to the and we hadn't cleared the names with him. he didn't know all the people, and he was not happy. but he gave brief remarks
governance, the latest of which was held at the wilson center in june on science and technology innovation. these symposia, which the institute co-chairs with china's state council, not only promote dialogue among stakeholders, but also allow participants to develop personal connections. the institute also recently released an initial report on u.s./china security perceptions, another big project we're working on with leading research institutions in the u.s. and beijing. and just last week we published sustaining u.s./china cooperation in clean energy, an overview of the difficulties both countries face in developing solar, wind and other alternative energy industries and the potential room for cooperation. last innovate, finally -- november, finally, henry participated in another one of our national conversations entitled afghanistan: is there a regional end game. the back story on this is interesting. he resisted when he learned that we had organized a brilliant panel of scholars and reporters to comment on his remarks. we hadn't cleared the names with him, he didn't know all the people
with other cargo ships from russia, japan or -- they're going to put in science experiments, gear that maybe they could repair, or stuff that they want to send back down to friends or family, and that's going to come back down on october 28th, splash down into the pacific, spacex folks will pluck it out of the ocean and deliver the cargo back to nasa. it is first of its kind in unma bringing back more. i'm sure they're excited to get some chocolate vanilla swirl. >> ice cream aside, it is significant, they're able to bring cargo, this is the beginning of what i'm sure they hope will be an ability to ferry astronauts. chad and i covered the final retirement of the "atlantis," how long before the private entities are able to send astronauts so we don't have to rely on the soyuz. >> spacex planned to use this unmanned dragon spacecraft, to scale it up into a seven-person spaceship, that was their primary goal while they were building it. they always said and said last night that in three years they expect to be ready to fly humans on a version of this spacecraft. they are one of four companies
that he uses. they also point out that his theory is not widely embraced. more sound social science has reached contrarian findings. we represent the legal the thence fund in this case the black student alliance at the university of texas. when you talk to the students about their experiences, i think you quickly learn that college is not exclusively a reserve of the wealthy and privileged. for many, it's an important opportunity to move from one circumstance to another brand participate in all of these things that we hope people would have access to american society. that is consistent with my own experience and my client's experience. i commend it to you the amicus brief file to look at the social science that mr. sander is offering. >> the empirical scholars a brief is actually wrong in its characterization of research. it has not been published in peer review publications. there are studies that have found that this connection. i would personally challenge any of those empirical scholars, any of those 11 people, who would like to have a debate judged by social sciences, i would be h
on the science now in question. here's susan candiotti. >> reporter: former massachusetts chemist annie dookhan. >> could you tell us what happened. >> reporter: the state of massachusetts is accusing dookhan of tampering with drug evidence that could call into question at least 34,000 cases going back to 2003. 34,000. at the moment she faces only three charges. however, in boston alone, the d.a. estimates as many as 500 convicted felons could be set free. how big of a mess is this? >> at this point, susan, we don't know. >> reporter: at this lab now closed by the state dookhan allegedly mishandled drugs seized by police for evidence at trial. she allegedly estimated the amount of drugs at times by simply looking at them and certified some drugs as cocaine that are now testing negative. she didn't just write down the wrong thing. prosecutors accuse her of doctoring evidence to change test results. >> she would take known cocaine from an area that she knew was cocaine and actually add them to the sample to make it cocaine. >> incredible story. let's turn to cnn contributor paul callen for legal
to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>and now to my point. that is a whole bunch of bunk! the powerful my steal an election but they cannot steal democracy. bloc [♪ theme music ♪] >> announcer: ladies and gentlemen, it's a the "stephanie miller show"! ♪ i'm walking on sunshine, woe ho ♪ ♪ i'm walking on sunshine, woe ho ♪ ♪ it's time to feel good, hey all right now. it's time to feel good. >> stephanie: yaw hoo, it is the "stephanie miller show." wow, check me out. look at this. >> what. >> stephanie: the former white house director of foreign affairs -- >> that sounds fancy. >> stephanie: right. >> to talk about mitt romney's foreign policy speech. [ wah wah ] . >> yeah. >> stephanie: it probably would have been devastating if any of it were true. that sounds bad. the president signed no foreign trade agreements at all? wow, that sounds horrible. >> except for the ones he did sign. [ bell chimes ] [ applause ] >> stephanie: and the other areas where his policy is exactly the cam
with robert anderson, a political science professor at columbia university. good morning and thanks for being with us. >> thanks for having me. >> where do debates fit in? how important is it? guest: the base can play an important role. they probably take second place to conventions. they play a much greater role in changing people's minds. they probably play a lesser role when people are finally making up their minds. also, very early in the election year, when voters are just learning, there is a lot of volatility. the debate divides the time line. there are changes in the polls the only slightly greater than normally. host: there is a story from "the wall street journal" what do viewers and listeners look for? as they watch a debate text are looking for their candidate to in or aod zinger stumble? guest: 12% might be persuaded all but the other 88% are just watching. after the debate tonight, we will have many speculating on who won the debate and who lost the debate. in terms of voter preference, and in -- not a great deal will change. host: c-span is at the university of denver for the f
to recruit 100,000 new math and science teachers to train to make sure our young people have -- to make sure our young people have the skills that they need. we got to train 2 million workers at community colleges to bring down college tuition cost s. we got to cut our oil imports in half and create thousands of new jobs and energy. we got to use the savings from ending the war in iraq and afghanistan, to pay down our deficit. put some people to work, doing some nation building right here at home. that's the agenda we need. that's how you strengthen the middle class. that's how you keep moving forward. that's the choice in this election. that's why i'm asking for your vote. now, my opponent, he's doing a lot of -- a little tap dance at the debate the other night. trying to wiggle out of stuff he's been saying for years. doing like a -- like "dancing with the stars." or maybe it was "extreme makeover." debate edition. but no matter what he says, my opponent, he's a big believer of the top downeconomics. he thinks if we spend another $5 trillion on tax cuts that favor the althiest, we get rid
100,000 math and science teachers, focus on early childhood education, provide job training for 2 million workers at community colleges, cut the growth of tuition costs in half, so you guys are not loaded up with that when you graduate. -- debt when you graduate. that is something we can do. i do not just talk the talk. i walk the block. -- walk the walk. under the student loan program, we cut out the middleman and gave the money directly to students. across the country, here we are getting better deals on programs, keeping rates low -- on pell grants, keeping rates low. we can meet these goals together. you can choose a better future for america. i want to use the money we are saving for ending the war is in iraq and afghanistan and use that to pay down our debt, but also put people to work rebuilding our roads and our bridges. governor romney said it was tragic to end the war in iraq. i disagree. i think bringing our troops home to their families was the right thing to do. if he had gotten his way, those troops would still be there. in his speech yesterday, he double down on tha
in political science 101, should be elected representative do what he believes is right or with a constituent thinks is right? you could give to the question one way or another. the important thing to take away from that is there is tension between the elected representative wants to do and what the constituent wants to do. no one wants to run from office so they can cast a lever from what the constituents to do. you want to be a candidate because you believe in something. nobody wants to just pull the lever for what the constituents want to do. all a super pak really can do is identify places where the election representative has gone out too far from the constituency and educate the electorate about how the elected representative is sideways with the public opinion of the people. take that advertisements the crossroads ran and were running in the states talking about how the president passed a stimulus program. the stimulus was widely -- wildly unpopular. all they can do is hold the president or another elected official and account for what they did. it cannot change public opinion about st
at science history, cyber world, popular culture and computer networking in politics. live at noon eastern on book tv on c-span2. >> next a symposium on partisan politics and compromise. this hour and a half event is hosted by the university of southern california schwarzenegger's institute for state and global policy. panelists include senator john mccain and former senator tom daschle. >> we all breathe the same air. ladies and gentlemen, please welcome the chairman of the institute and the inaugural holder of the governor downey chair professor of state and global policy at u.s.e., governor arnold schwarzenegger. [applause] >> thank you. thank you. thank you very much. thank you very much for the fantastic introduction. that's exactly the way i wrote it. [laughter] also thank you very much for your great partnership. one thing i wanted to correct what you said today is i did not win miss universe. different bikinis, waxing, all of those things i did not win that competition. it's mr. universe. anyway, i want to say how enthusiastic i am about being in partnership with u.s.c. the preside
Search Results 0 to 40 of about 41 (some duplicates have been removed)

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